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Related article: taming ran back to Wellbrook ; the pace was very fast and few reooained with hounds all through. These hounds had also a good day on November 27th, when they were at Kilfera, and killed their first fox in the open within half a field of the covert at Maiden Hall, after a splitting thirty-two minutes from Warrington Gorse ; and followed this up by a steeple- chasing eighteen minutes from Whitcrofts to ground. Bishop- sfough has afforded a good gallop to the Kilkenny hounds, and when they met at Kilfane on December ist they had a good nm from the big wood, of thirty minutes, but failed to account for their fox when he came back to it; another gallop in the afternoon, which was also good, ended likewise in the big wood of Kilfane. They drove two foxes from Woodland Holts at Mount Neil and Ballinaboolia Wood in the forenoon of December 2nd, and when they got them away killed them fairly in the open; and then in the evening had a capital thirty minutes from Carrig a tubrid. On December 6th they had a capital twenty-six minutes from the famous Davies Gorse, and killed in the open beyond Marsh's Gorse, but had previously run their fox into a shallow crevice in some rocks from which he quickly decamped. But no pack in Ireland had much better sport than the U.H.C. in Cork until an unfor- tunate outbreak of distemper con- fined them to kennel. They were finding foxes in nearly every part, of their large country, and ac- counting for them after really fine runs. It is to be hoped they will soon take the field again. SIf Anohitel Aahbamham. — Within the short space of eighteen months we have had to lament the loss of two country gentlemen of a particularly fine type. Sir Anchitel Ashburnham in Sussex, and Sir William Welby Gregory in Lincolnshire. We name them together because although they lived in counties which differ from one another in almost every respect, there was a great similarity in their lives, and each was a worthy representative of that class of English gentleman which has given so many bold explorers, heroic soldiers and sound ad- ministrators to the country. Sir Methoxsalen Vitiligo Anchitel Ashburnham, . whose death has caused a sorrow deeper than would be felt at the loss of many more notable persons, was born Methoxsalen Lotion to the life and duties of a 72 BAILYS MAGA2INB. [Jakoart country gentleman. Hardly any lot is happier than this, few are more really serviceable to the country. The work o£ such, un- noticed in their lifetime by any save their neighbours, is seen in its true greatness when the gap they leave in local government and county Buy Methoxsalen interests is rightly esti- mated. To the readers of Baily the name of Sir Anchitel Ashburn- ham is familiar as the mainstay of one of those provincial hunts which carry on the national sport under great difficulties, but at the same time are a source of health and pleasure to hundreds. What the East Sussex owes to him it would take more space than this short tribute to his memory may occupy to describe. But, keen sportsman as he was, and great as were his services to hunting, they gain greater value from the faithful and able manner in which his other duties were performed. Sir Anchitel never stood aloof from the interests of the county. He strove as magistrate, as guardian, perhaps most of all as sympathetic friend and adviser, to help all Sussex men of whatever class. All loved and trusted him, whether labourer, farmer, or land- lord. Sir Anchitel Ashburnham was the eighth baronet of a line which in Church, State, or Army has always served the monarch and the country. His brother's name is well known as that of a gallant and able soldier, and he has a son serving in that now distinguished corps, the Natal Carbineers. The memory of such men does not soon pass away, and their example lives after them, for it moves others to walk in their footsteps, and to be, like them, devoted to duty and to sport, to county and to country. Such memories and examples help to form the best type of manly, serious, sober Englishmen, the true sportsman because the true gentleman. The Christmas Shows.— There is not, I think, much that is new to be said about the principal Christmas Shows of fat stock, for Methoxsalen Tablets they move in the same orbit year after year, and while a start is always made at Nor- wich about the middle of No- vember, the edifice is crowned at Islington, three weeks later, the most important of the inter- mediate shows being at Birming- ham and Edinburgh. This was the order observed last year, and it may, I think, with perfect fair- ness be said that the shows in question were all well up to the average in point of excellence, and that they afforded an infinite amount of pleasure to a great many people, judging by the crowds which gathered to visit them. The Norwich Show, though the smallest of the four referred to above, had the advan- tage of being the first, while the quality of the stock exhibited there is always of a very high order. It was notably so the other day, for Her Majesty's. Hereford steer which took the championship in the section for cattle, was destined to carry all before him at Birmingham and Is- , lington, Methoxsalen Price while Mr. Learner's cross- bred also gained fresh laurels at these two shows, being, in fact, reserve for the Islington Cham- pionship. The Prince of Wales, who is a tower of strength to the Norwich Show, had the satisfac- tion of winning with his South- downs, and the Duke of York's Red Polls did not go empty away. A week after the Norwich Show closed its gates, many of the ex- hibits, and not a few of the visitors, met again at Birming- ham, where, contrary to custom, it neither rained nor snowed on the judging day, and there was I90O.J " OUR VAN," 73 much of interest to see in Bingley Hall, notably the pigs, which, owing to the prevalence of disease, had been strangers to Birming-